The Faith and Foibles of Strong-Willed Creatives

February 7, 2012

There’s a certain kind of artist and writer with a tremendously strong will ~ determined, persistent, ambitious, unable to deny the need for self-expression, even when it’s impractical or difficult.

I know. I’m one of them. And most of my clients are too.

As a will-driven artist or writer, you face a couple of problems.

  • You can live too much from your left brain, with its love of the rational and linear, and get cut off from your right-brained intuition and creativity. When you can’t enter flow regularly, you butt up against procrastination. Your art may be lacking dimensionality.
  • Your need for accomplishment makes it hard for you to relax and enjoy life, to fill your tank with Truth and Beauty. This problem can lead to burn-out, depression, or alienation from your muse. It can also manifest as lots of busyness on things you can control and check off, and avoidance of your creative work, which is more messy and unpredictable.

I became a creativity coach because I’ve been there.

Derailed by busyness, depression, and burn-out.

Spinning my wheels in procrastination.

And thanks in part to my stubbornness and unwillingness to settle, and the help of many wise people (including myself), I don’t live in that place any longer. (I visit occasionally, but then I find my way home to flow.)

I am a coach because my gratitude for what I’ve learned compels me to share with others in the same boat.

I’m in love with your creative desire and stick-to-itiveness. I want nothing more than to see you happy, healthy, and producing true and beautiful art with ease. I totally believe that is possible for you, given enough time and support.

Because you have particularly useful strengths, too.

  • You stick with your art. You may sometimes get discouraged by your limitations, but you don’t give up. You keep on wrestling the angel. You’re always getting better.
  • You search out the help you need to improve your craft and your creative process. You’re drawn to reading, exploring, wondering, How do people make this work? and then trying new approaches.

I invite you to Enter the Labyrinth.

For the past year, I’ve been offering short-term coaching packages of four sessions. Conventional wisdom says that packages like this are easier to market and sell. And much can be done in a focused, intense period of coaching. Some of my clients have had amazing breakthroughs in just one conversation.

What I’ve seen, however, is that packaging my offerings this way doesn’t serve clients who need longer-term coaching for wholesale changes, inside and out.

I know from my own experience that when I need support, my tendency is to get the minimum to keep me going, and then strike back out on my own. (What, my tank’s empty? Well, just give me five bucks’ worth, I don’t have time to fill the whole thing.)

When the moment comes and you decide that life is unworkable in its present form, don’t just patch things up and plunge back into the fray alone. Take the time to revamp thoroughly. Engage with your creative life in a deep, sustained way, and develop a strong rapport with your coach over time.

To that end, I’ve created Enter the Labyrinth.
Slow-release coaching for strong-willed creatives.

I’ll be honest, I’m making this change for myself too. I’d much rather work with a few clients over a longer period than many people for a short time. I get absorbed in my clients’ journeys and I want to see their progress. There’s a reason I’m a novelist rather than a short story writer ~ I cherish the long form, the immersive experience.

So. If you want to bring the two halves of your creative personality back into collaboration, come and Enter the Labyrinth.

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{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Pat March 21, 2012 at 3:39 am

Dear Alison,

Your piece about Walking Depression is absolutely excellent. You give so much back to the world and I think you’re an amazing human being :)

One of my favourite jobs was with Canadian Mental Health and now the help for people suffering with something like depression is so limited. Yes, there was a stigma with being a patient in a mental health facility, but at least a person with schizophrenia for instance, was able to stay until recovered. Now I think this limit is 48 hours and you’re put out the door. However, I’ve never been a big fan of psychiatric drugs and that was part of the staying in a hospital package.

Thanks again and keep up the good work!

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Alison March 21, 2012 at 12:19 pm

Thank you, Pat! That means a lot to me.

I would agree with you that not all people with depression are getting the help they need. My experience has mostly been with the milder end of the spectrum, i.e. not suicidal or in need of hospitalization, but with that chronic sadness that I describe in the walking depression post.

I’m hoping the latest post, on 10 ways to walk away from depression, will point more people in the right direction. I agree that drugs are just one way out and not for everyone:

http://www.gresik.ca/2012/03/10-ways-to-walk-away-from-depression/

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